Dunza – Star Client

Dunza is actually the man himself James Jackson Toth [aka Wooden Wand also a prime part of One Eleven Heavy].

The songs you hear on “Star Client” started out as regular songs of his but he made these special versions and came to love them so much, he deleted the originals. Having rinsed this album non-stop for two months, I think he was totally justified. I don’t have any idea how many times I’ve played it now and I’m not stopping.

So, Dunza is unlike anything he’s ever done….a strong strain of dub……some ground up Berlin-school kosmische…..the unmistakable aroma of JJT himself. Yes, he’s there singing and playing the dub of it all stretches it all out into deepest space.

Cover art by Sarah Coppen: https://www.instagram.com/artbydesertmoon/

Star Client is the perfect summer album and the ultimate wake and bake album.

Limited edition of 100 yellow cassettes.
Second edition of 50 clear yellow cassettes.

WAS55

Review from The Quietus

In 2019, James Toth retired his Wooden Wand alias, preferring to concentrate on playing in One Eleven Heavy. That band was soon put on ice too, if temporarily. Its members are based in different countries, so there wasn’t much prospect of sneaking in the odd rehearsal between the loosening and tightening of infection-quelling restrictions. During that time, one of Toth’s tactics to avoid “going berserk” was to create this new project, Dunza. After completing four songs with which he was fairly satisfied, he then set about remixing each piece. Toth found he preferred the adapted versions to such an extent that he impulsively deleted the originals. Had he gone berserk after all? Listening to the cuts that remain in existence, he seems to have made a fruitful choice. Pretty far removed from Toth’s more singer-songwriter fare, Star Client is a slow-paced and hazy portion of homebrewed dub-psych. It sounds as though the opener, ‘Disowned’, retains the largest amount of its initial form, vocals-wise at least. Even so, Toth has fucked its formula without preciousness. It’s an approach similar to the last few records by those crazy kids from Low, here used to warmer and less solemn effect. The middle cuts had my hips swaying and eyelids drooping in a similar manner to my first exposure to On Patrol by Sun Araw. Although it concludes this particular collection, the shorter ‘Another Life’ almost feels like a suspenseful intro, feasibly indicating that the work of Toth’s latest alter-ego is not yet done(za).

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