New (old) Can Album Coming Soon

The beautifully named Crippled Dick Hot Wax Records are releasing the unreleased soundtrack by Irmin Schmidt & The Inner Space to the 1968 film “Kama Sutra”

Here’s the official record label word:

Better late than never? A good four decades after its making, a rare gem is up for release: the soundtrack to Kobi Jaeger’s erotic and educational epic “KAMASUTRA – consummation of love” composed and recorded by Irmin Schmidt & The Inner Space. A precursor to krautrock pioneers CAN, Schmidt’s 1968 recording assembles Can’s original line-up – Michael Karoli, Jaki Liebezeit and Malcolm Mooney – who later went on to craft the band’s seminal debut, Monster Movie.

The film KAMASUTRA – consummation of love switches between India and Germany and stars Bruno Dietrich and Barbara Schöne. A prime example of late 1960s German erotica and the so-called sexual revolution, it liberated the subject of sex from dingy red light cinemas and whisked it away to the exotic Far East, to the realm that – more than a millennium earlier – had spawned the erotic teachings of the KAMASUTRA. Fast-forward to the present day and you will find the film’s well-intentioned, in parts pedagogical approach bristling with (un)intentional comedy.

Many bands and composers from the late 1960s were intrigued by eastern philosophy and influenced by oriental sounds. Besides several laid-back, percussive instrumentals laced with flutes and sitars, the soundtrack also features two vocal tracks: ‘I’m Hiding My Nightingale’ (sung by Margarete Juvan), ‘There Was A Man’ (sung by Malcolm Mooney).

KAMASUTRA – consummation of love is available as a CD digipack and limited gatefold vinyl (both by Crippled Dick Hot Wax) as well as a digital release (via Finetunes).

MORE IRMIN SCHMIDT FILMMUSIK COMING OUT

October 5th is Germany day over at Mute Records as they are also releasing “Filmmusik Anthology Vol 4&5” as a double CD. On the subject of the release, Mute say:

Founder of the legendary German rock group CAN, Irmin Schmidt has been writing music for films for over 40 years, and as a trained pianist, composer and conductor, has roots in classical music, jazz, and of course in rock music.

This double CD release, Filmmusik Anthology Vol 4&5, follows 1994’s Anthology Soundtracks 1978-1993 and contains a selection of Schmidt’s works over the last 10 years for 20 different films for both the big screen and television. The anthology includes tracks from the critically acclaimed German TV series Bloch and Tatort and the award winning film Schneeland.

These pieces of music are a fascinating insight into the art of film score music from a veteran who has honed his craft masterfully over the years as well as being a wonderful album to just sit, relax and enjoy.

Filmmusik Anthology Vol. 4&5 also includes eight tracks from the original score of the latest Wim Wenders film, Palermo Shooting, which premiered in the Official Selection of the Cannes film festival 2008.”

FREE VIDEO OF DAMO SUZUKI WITH KAWABATA MAKOTO

Are you aware of the internet archive? Thanks to them I was able to find a copy of the old version of this website and put all the old articles over on the features page. They also store non-copyright media. You can download films that have have expired or lapsed copyright such as “Nosferatu” or “Night of the Living Dead”. They also have a live music archive where you can access for free live recordings of artists who don’t mind their shows being distributed in this way.

Well, I thought it was of particular note that they have a video of a Dublin gig played by Damo Suzuki [ex-Can] and Kawabata Makoto of Acid Mothers Temple along with some local collaborators. You can download it from:
http://www.archive.org/details/DamoSuzukiMakotoKawabataDublin08

PRE-MOONEY CAN ALBUM FINALLY GETS RELEASED

Wah Wah Records in Spain have released an album soundtrack for the film “Agilok & Blubbo” by a certain band named The Inner Space.

I’ll let the press release take up the story from here:
The Inner Space is the stuff of legend. This obscure outfit is best known as the ancestor band of Can and not much is known about them except it featured the core members of Can (Irmin Schmidt, Holger Czukay, Michael Karoli and Jaki Liebezeit) and lasted just a few months before renaming themselves The Can and releasing Monster Movie. They left two ultra-obscure seven inches as their only recorded legacy and only the first of them is credited to The Inner Space, it contained two songs taken from the soundtrack of 1969’s underground film Agilok & Blubbo. Originally released by the German Vogue label in 1969, it currently fetches prices around the 300 euro mark in the collector’s circuit. Given the obscurity of both the band and its recorded output, we’re proud to present, for the first time to the public, not only the aforementioned singles but the complete soundtrack to Peter F. Scheneider’s offbeat political satire Agilok & Blubbo. Previously unavailable until now, the original master tapes of this soundtrack have been stored in the archives of legendary German producer and music publisher Hans Wewerka who produced the recording sessions back in 1969. Here you can hear history in the making, the first step of a group of musicians who’ll go on to achieve fame, success and recognition over the ’70s, helping define a sound (often called Krautrock) that has been highly influential to this day. Those familiar with Can’s output will recognize some of the band’s characteristic sound, albeit in an embryonic form. Songs like ‘Agilok & Blubbo’ or ‘Kamera Song’ already hint at their later pop brilliance whereas the short cues and extended free jams found elsewhere in this soundtrack reminds us from the heterogeneous roots of a bunch of musicians coming from rock, jazz and avant-garde backgrounds. All in all, an excellent glimpse into the early stages of an innovative band developing its own musical language. This reissue includes detailed liner notes by Wah Wah’s very own Raül G.Pratginestós and comes illustrated by original b/w shoots from the movie production. CD issue contains two bonus tracks: ‘Memographie,’ plus Irmin Schmidt’s 1967 composition ‘Hexapussy.’ In all, over 28 minutes of bonus material!”